Do's and Don'ts of Paper 1

Do's Don'ts
Annotate the text, applying annotation strategies.  Start writing without unpacking the stimulus text.
Make a thesis, plan, mind map and outline.
Jump into analysis without a thesis statement or plan.
Explore and go beyond the scope of the guiding question.
Limit yourself to the scope of a (narrow) guiding question. 
Include information about the texts (their purposes, types and audiences) in the introduction.
Start with sweeping generalisations.
Start paragraphs by connecting style (how writers write) and purpose (why writers write).
Organise paragraphs exclusively and separately on style, purpose, theme, visuals, text type, etc.
Convince the examiner that your interpretations of the text are insightful.
Just comment on what you notice, see or think.
Evaluate the effectiveness of the author’s choices in achieving his/her purposes.
List the techniques / devices of the author.
Evaluate the effectiveness of the author’s choices in achieving his/her purposes.
List the techniques / devices of the author.
Explore larger stylistic elements, such as narrative technique, imagery, symbolism and diction.
Focus too narrowly on unique, one-off examples of onomatopoeia, fricatives, polysyndeton, etc.
Explore the relationship between the visual and written elements.
Focus only on the words or pictures separately.
Integrate quotations or descriptions of visuals into your argument.
Include seemingly random quotations that are irrelevant of the argument.
Quote / reference from multiple parts of the stimulus text in each paragraph.
Analyse the stimulus text line-by-line.
Last modified: Saturday, 11 January 2020, 3:07 PM